Prosody Blog

Articles and conversations dedicated to innovation, research and practice with children and young people in need of support, protection and care

March 18, 2019

Technology and Trauma: 6 Apps for helping trauma transformation

Some of the most frequently asked questions in our training programs are about the use of technology; can we use it to successfully rewire neuronal pathways and increase synaptic activity where trauma has left deep tracks of damage?

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March 7, 2019

A story that started with a man called Dan Hughes

This blog post is written by Pauline Lodge, Manager of Professional Education Services. Around 25 years ago, I undertook a workshop with a man called Dan Hughes, who took me and the others in the room on a journey to understand the wonderful way he engaged with children and young people and their caregivers. This …

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March 5, 2019

What is trauma?

Depending on who or what you read, trauma will be defined in a variety of ways. Is it simple or complex? Developmental, relational or attachment oriented? Within the field of childhood trauma we have a multitude of definitions and sub categories that can be quite confusing for practitioners. 

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February 19, 2019

Together, let’s help to make all schools Trauma-Aware!

This blog was written by Dr. Judith Howard, a Senior Lecturer and researcher from the Queensland University of Technology. In most schools, and in many classrooms, there are students who have experienced complex childhood trauma who would benefit immensely from a system-wide, trauma-aware approach to schooling.  Despite the best intentions of schools and many school …

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February 13, 2019

Five activities that promote connected safety for traumatised children and carers

This blog post is written by Dr. Joe Tucci, CEO of The Australian Childhood Foundation. Over the last two weeks, I have written two blogs about integrating the work of Steve Porges about safety into practice that centralizes it as a resource for children who have experienced trauma. In this third and final blog, I …

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February 6, 2019

How to invite safety back into the relationships around traumatised children?

This blog post was written by Joe Tucci, CEO of The Australian Childhood Foundation. Last week, I wrote about three practice principles that were derived from an exploration of the neuroscience of safety. In this blog, I describe a way of working that centralises safety as the theme for healing the physiological and psychological consequences …

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January 7, 2019

Is all trauma the same?

This blog post has been written by Dr Joe Tucci, CEO of the Australian Childhood Foundation. I spent some time recently reading through the literature on poly-victimisation. I remember listening to David Finkelhor more than a decade ago presenting findings from his research that found that many of the children who had been identified as …

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October 12, 2018

Taking Developmental Dyadic Psychotherapy to the next level

This blog post was written by Jaclyn Guest Senior Counsellor, Child Trauma Service.   How many traumatised children do you know that can tell you about their inner emotional experiences using words? Trauma attacks stories. It scrambles our ability to tell our stories. It steals our opportunities to have our stories heard and validated. The …

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August 22, 2018

The Need for an External Regulator in the Playroom

When babies are crying, distressed, and upset, why do we rock them back and forth? Founder and President of the Play Therapy Institute of Colorado, Lisa Dion, helps us to understand the importance of therapists becoming external regulators in the playroom as children work towards integrating their challenging experiences.

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August 13, 2018

Relational Safety and Placement Stability – Outcomes of the TrACK Program (Part 1)

Noel McNamara explores the outcomes of the TrACK Program – a treatment and care for Kids program which seeks to provide support for vulnerable children and young people who have experienced abuse related trauma.

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